Cases - Alberta

Decisions made by the courts in the cases presented to them (also called judgments) provide an interpretation and application of legislation (the written laws) as well as a record of precedents (how previous decisions may guide a current decision). The resources in this section can be used to find written reports of court decisions.

To find information about cases in other parts of Canada, see CANLII (Canadian Legal Information Institute)

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Not sure where to begin finding answers to your questions. Get started with our suggested resources. See additional resources below for more information.

Alberta Resources

This is a search page for Tribunal and Court Decisions of the Alberta Human Rights Commission. Choose to search for a decision directly, or choose either Court or Tribunal Decisions and browse by year. The decisions can then be downloaded in PDF.

Related legal topic(s): Courts and court judgments, Human rights

A searchable database of Alberta judgments can be found on CanLii. For official versions of judgments, copies of the original court files may be obtained through the Alberta Courts. For more information, see the appropriate level of court:

Court of Appeal judgmentsCourt of Queen's Bench judgmentsProvincial Court of Alberta judgments

Related legal topic(s): Legal research, Legislative materials

This resource is provided by Alberta Law Libraries. Provides information on finding provincial, federal, and internation cases.

Related legal topic(s): Legal research, Legislative materials

From the Great Library of the Law Society of Upper Canada, this web page provides annotated links to case law as well as case-related services and information available mainly on the websites of Alberta courts and administrative tribunals. 

Related legal topic(s): Administration of justice, Courts and court judgments, Legal research, Legislative materials

Acts are passed by members of the legislative assembly (MLAs). They are introduced as bills, and debated in the Legislature before being put to a vote. If the assembly passes a bill, it receives royal assent from the Lieutenant Governor, at which point it becomes law.For further information on this process, see the Citizen's Guide to the Alberta Legislature. For information on Alberta's published statutes and regulations, see A User's Guide to Legislation.

Related legal topic(s): Legal process, Legal research, Legislative materials