Courthouse Services

“There are basically four levels of court in Canada. First there are provincial/territorial courts, which handle the great majority of cases that come into the system. Second are the provincial/territorial superior courts. These courts deal with more serious crimes and also take appeals from provincial/territorial court judgments. On the same level, but responsible for different issues, is the Federal Court. At the next level are the provincial/territorial courts of appeal and the Federal Court of Appeal, while the highest level is occupied by the Supreme Court of Canada.” (From: Canada’s Court System – Department of Justice)

The courts across Canada provide a variety of services to support the general public in accessing the court system. To learn more about the court process, see the legal topic: Legal process

The following services are offered through the Alberta Courts. For other resources about going to court see the section Preparing for Court

CPLEA Suggested Resources

Not sure where to begin finding answers to your questions. Get started with our suggested resources. See additional resources below for more information.

The goal of the Court Assistance Program (Queen's Bench Amicus Program) is to improve access to justice for self-represented litigants appearing in Queen' Bench Justice and Masters Chambers. This program brings volunteer lawyers into Chambers, where they act as 'amicus curiae' and help the court understand the issues related and the positions taken by unrepresented litigants. The  program offers opportunity for courtroom advocacy in a positive environment, which can give great skills-building experience for lawyers and students, and the program is beneficial for overall professional development, mentoring, networking, building collegiality, and enhancing the public image of the legal profession.  This service is available in Calgary and Edmonton. Check with the courthouse for dates and times.

Related legal topic(s): Legal services, Self-representation

Duty Counsel are lawyers who assist people without a lawyer and can offer limited advice. Duty Counsel services are provided free of charge.

Related legal topic(s): Legal process, Legal services, Self-representation

Probono Law Alberta provides help for individuals through their Court Based Programs.PBLA engages volunteer lawyers in programs operating out of the Calgary Court Centre and Edmonton Law Courts. Visit their website for locations and times.

Related legal topic(s): Legal services, Self-representation

Family Court Counsellors provide services, at no cost, to families who are involved in parenting disputes and are living separate and apart. The service is designed for people who are not represented by a lawyer. Services may include: Information on options and services for resolving family issues; Referrals to services and programs including mediation; Information on the effects of separation and divorce on children; Help to negotiate agreements; Assistance with court applications, arranging court dates and presenting the case in Provincial Court.

Related legal topic(s): Family law general resources, Legal services, Self-representation

Legal Aid's Duty Counsel Program provides summary legal advice and assistance to unrepresented persons for preliminary appearances before the courts and selected tribunals is offered at no cost to the person.  Duty Counsel generally plays two key service roles:  the formal role as amicus (friend of the court) where Counsel offers assistance to the client in sorting through what should be ready and properly prepared  before  court for presentation to the judge, and the less formal role as advisor helping the client to understand what is taking place in and out of court.

Related legal topic(s): Legal services

Native Counselling works to ensure that Native people receive fair and equitable treatment in the justice system. NCSA delivers its programs and services province wide.. Its programs and services are designed and delivered for Aboriginal people, by Aboriginal people.

Related legal topic(s): Legal services, Restorative justice

Alberta Resources

This section of the Alberta Courts website provides information about court locations around the province, contact information and sittings.

Related legal topic(s): Courts and court judgments

This main page of the Alberta Courts website outlines the three court divisions: Alberta's Court of Appeal, Court of Queen's Bench, and Provincial Court, as well as the Court Services division. Descriptions include links to the Locations and Sittings for each court.

Related legal topic(s): Courts and court judgments

The Resolution and Court Administration Services Division provides administrative support to all the courts within the province, including electronic legal information services through Alberta Law Libraries. Topics in this section of the Alberta Courts website include: Mediation Programs; Family Justice Services; Court Forms and Orders Services (formly known as the Family Law Information Centre (FLIC) and LInC - Law Information Centres); Judgments; Jury Duty; ; Sheriff - Civil Enforcement; Review / Assessment Office; Rules of Court; Transcript Management Services; Publications; Video Conferencing. They also offer: Information services for the public on court procedures and legal services options; assistance with locating and filling out court forms; and referrals to other community legal services, as well as assessment services, dispute resolution services for child support, family and child medication, conflict intervention, family mediation, and civil mediation to help parties who filed an action in small claims court to reach a negotiated settlement.

Related legal topic(s): Civil actions, Legal process, Legal services, Mediation and alternative dispute resolution, Self-representation, Small claims court

Part of the Alberta Court Services is access to the Alberta Law Libraries. The primary mission of Alberta Law Libraries is to facilitate access to legal information for the Alberta community, including its judiciary, lawyers, citizens, libraries and government agencies. A section of their website is dedicated to helping Albertans Get pointed in the right direction as they begin their legal research. mbers of the Alberta Law Libraries (ALL) team have prepared research guides on legislation, case law and a variety of subject-specific areas. In these guides, you will find information, resources and links about several areas of law. Alberta Law Libraries (ALL) were formed in 2009 when Alberta Court Libraries and Alberta Law Society Libraries were amalgamated. ALL has served the legal community in Alberta since 1885 and use of our collections is free to all who visit our libraries.

Related legal topic(s): Law libraries, Self-representation

The mission of the Elizabeth Fry Society of Edmonton is to foster the dignity and worth of women who come into conflict with the law, and help them live as valued members of their communities. They are a not-for-profit organization that has existed in Edmonton since 1977. The society offers a variety of programs for women and girls including a legal clinic. The Legal Clinic Program assists federally sentenced women at Edmonton Institute for Women by addressing their legal needs. The society has court workers who provide information to both men and women on court procedure and plea options.  They also provide referrals to duty counsel and other community resources.

Related legal topic(s): Legal services, Reintegration, Restorative justice

Family Mediation Services offers free information and assistance with: bringing applications in Provincial (Family) Court concerning custody, access and private guardianship of children; mediation services to assist families in resolving parenting issues, e.g. custody, access, private guardianship and child support; courses to improve parenting skills and communication between parents who are living apart; and other court-directed services intended to aid in resolving parenting disputes.

Related legal topic(s): Charter of Rights, Child support, Custody and access, Guardianship and trusteeship, Mediation and alternative dispute resolution

The Mediation and Restorative Justice Centre (MRJC) is a not-for-profit organization devoted to building safer and peaceful communities. They provide mediation services to people and groups in conflict (neightbour disputes, family situations between siblings, parents, children or other family members), and restorative justice services to victims and offenders. These services are offered free of charge to anyone in the greater Edmonton region (Alberta).

Related legal topic(s): Mediation and alternative dispute resolution, Restorative justice, Self-representation

How to order a Provincial Court or Court of Queen's Bench courtroom transcript.

Related legal topic(s): Legal process, Self-representation

This section of the Alberta Provincial Courts website explains about using mediation to resolve a lawsuit. You may request mediation or the court may select your lawsuit for mediation once a Dispute Note has been filed. This program is free to the parties involved.

Related legal topic(s): Mediation and alternative dispute resolution


This page from the Office of the Commissioner for Federal Judicial Affairs is a directory of links to federal and provincial court sites, provincial and territorial law, constitutional texts, federal and provincial case law, and related statutory resources.
Related legal topic(s): Courts and court judgments

The Federal Court is Canada's national trial court which hears and decides legal disputes arising in the federal domain, including claims against the Government of Canada, civil suits in federally-regulated areas and challenges to the decisions of federal tribunals. Its authority derives primarily from the Federal Courts Act.

Related legal topic(s): Courts and court judgments, Federal government departments

This portal provides information and instructions on what is expected of you when you bring your own application for leave to appeal or when you have been named as a respondent on an application for leave to appeal. An application for leave to appeal is a document by which a party requests leave to be heard by the Supreme Court of Canada in an appeal from a judgment of a court of appeal. Visit this website for more information and instructions.

Related legal topic(s): Legal process, Self-representation

The Supreme Court of Canada is Canada's final court of appeal, the last judicial resort for all litigants, whether individuals or governments. Its jurisdiction embraces both the civil law of the province of Quebec and the common law of the other provinces and territories.

Related legal topic(s): Courts and court judgments, Federal government departments

The Tax Court of Canada is the youngest superior court in Canada. The Court’s jurisdiction includes the hearing of appeals from assessments under the Income Tax Act, the Excise Tax Act (Goods and Services Tax “GST”), the Employment Insurance Act and the Canada Pension Plan, among others. The website gives access to the court judgments as well as providing information for people who plan to represent themselves at the court.

Related legal topic(s): Courts and court judgments, Taxation